Welsh cakes: Not cakes nor biscuits, but a staple | SBS Food – SBS

​​Eating Welsh cakes is a ‘when in Wales’ melt-in-your-mouth moment. The Welsh fare is usually served for afternoon tea, but what exactly are Welsh cakes, which are traditionally called picau ar y maen?
Think of the Welsh cake as a cousin of the English scone. Although both round in shape, a Welsh cake is flatter; it’s usually up to 8 centimetres in diameter and about 1 centimetre thick. Like the scone, it includes flour, butter or lard, dried fruits, milk, eggs and spices like nutmeg. It’s sometimes dusted off with caster sugar. A healthy snack it is not but consider it a Welsh staple.

WELSH CAKES RECIPE

Welsh cakes

These are pretty much a fried scone and are packed with long-lasting dried fruits, perfect for those colder nights. 

These are pretty much a fried scone and are packed with long-lasting dried fruits, perfect for those colder nights. 
These cakes have been eaten widely in Wales since the late nineteenth century. Welsh cakes are also called ‘bakestones’ since they’re traditionally cooked on a bake stone – a type of griddle – and cooked over an open fire. According to the National Museum Wales, they’re also known as other Welsh names for bakestone, including tishan lechwan and tishan ar y mân. These days, Welsh cakes are typically baked in the oven or cooked in a pan.

Once cooked, they can be eaten hot or cold as is, unlike their English counterparts which are usually eaten with a spread of jam and cream or butter.
Sometimes the simplest of treats can be the most nourishing for the soul. First-generation Australian Jane Hacker tells SBS Food that she bakes Welsh cakes at home in Perth to recall fond memories of her family’s Welsh hometown of Swansea.
« The smell of freshly baked Welsh cakes reminds me of walking through the Swansea Christmas markets and being handed a warm paper bag of fluffy, buttery joy and trying not to eat them all before I got home, » Hacker says.
« The smell of freshly baked Welsh cakes reminds me of walking through the Swansea Christmas markets and being handed a warm paper bag of fluffy, buttery joy. »
Even though Welsh cakes aren’t a traditional Christmas snack, Hacker says she likes cooking them on a cast-iron baking stone to celebrate festive times. 
« We always bake Welsh cakes at Christmas time to bring a little taste of Wales to our Aussie Christmas and on St David’s Day. »
St David’s Day, held on 1 March each year, is a celebration of Wales’ patron saint. To commemorate the day, the Welsh traditionally wear the national emblems; a daffodil and a leek. They also hold parades and eisteddfodau (arts festivals).

WELSH FARE

Glamorgan sausages with watercress salad

“It wasn’t hard to fall in love with this classic Welsh dish as it is completely vegetarian. The recipe uses breadcrumbs instead of meat and was popular during World War 2 when meat was scarce. I prefer panko crumbs instead of regular breadcrumbs here as they add more texture to the sausages. ” Luke Nguyen, Luke Nguyen’s United Kingdom

“It wasn’t hard to fall in love with this classic Welsh dish as it is completely vegetarian. The recipe uses breadcrumbs instead of meat and was popular during World War 2 when meat was scarce. I prefer panko crumbs instead of regular breadcrumbs here as they add more texture to the sausages. ” Luke Nguyen, Luke Nguyen’s United Kingdom
When it comes to feasting, locals typically prepare Welsh fare, including bara brith (fruit loaf), cawl (meat and vegetable soup), glamorgan sausages (vegetarian sausages) and of course, Welsh cakes. Because, when in Wales.

MORE WELSH FOOD

Welsh food bank shocked after someone donates 46-year-old can of soup
Workers were shocked to receive a donated can of Heinz kidney soup, which had been purchased for '10d' more than 46 years ago.

Cockles and laverbread with white wine sauce

“Laverbread, or bara lawr as it’s known in the local tongue, is a traditional Welsh delicacy. Mainly found clinging to exposed rocks, the seaweed harvested on the West Coast of the British Isles and Southern Ireland. After being gathered, laverbread is thoroughly washed and cooked down until it becomes soft. It is then minced to turn it into a thick black-green paste. If you can’t find laverbread, use chopped nori sheets instead.” Luke Nguyen, Luke Nguyen’s United Kingdom

Perl Las and onion bread

“This stunning bread recipe features caramelised onions and Perl Las, which is a creamy, mild and salty Welsh blue cheese. Be sure to serve this dish hot, so that when you slice the cheese oozes out nicely.” Luke Nguyen, Luke Nguyen’s United Kingdom

Welsh rarebit

After a fresh take on the classic cheese toastie? Try Matthew Evans’ Welsh Rarebit. This dish combines cheddar and pale beer with a hit of Dijon mustard. Top it with a poached egg and it becomes a ‘Welsh Buck’.

“Laverbread, or bara lawr as it’s known in the local tongue, is a traditional Welsh delicacy. Mainly found clinging to exposed rocks, the seaweed harvested on the West Coast of the British Isles and Southern Ireland. After being gathered, laverbread is thoroughly washed and cooked down until it becomes soft. It is then minced to turn it into a thick black-green paste. If you can’t find laverbread, use chopped nori sheets instead.” Luke Nguyen, Luke Nguyen’s United Kingdom
“This stunning bread recipe features caramelised onions and Perl Las, which is a creamy, mild and salty Welsh blue cheese. Be sure to serve this dish hot, so that when you slice the cheese oozes out nicely.” Luke Nguyen, Luke Nguyen’s United Kingdom
After a fresh take on the classic cheese toastie? Try Matthew Evans’ Welsh Rarebit. This dish combines cheddar and pale beer with a hit of Dijon mustard. Top it with a poached egg and it becomes a ‘Welsh Buck’.
SBS acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia.

source

Vous aimerez aussi...